Epson Celebrates Photographic Truth Through the Art of Print

Photographic artist Nathaniel Coalson exhibits at Oxford International Art Fair 2018 with works printed with Epson Professional Photo Printer

Epson Celebrates Photographic Truth Through the Art of Print

Image: Eternal Cycles - Nathaniel Coalson 2007

In the digital age, where many have replaced the cinema with Netflix, festivals with Facebook, and galleries with Instagram, Epson is helping professional and artistic photographers celebrate and share the power of truth expressed through the printed image. One such artist is American-born abstract photographer and Associate of the Royal Photographic Society Nathaniel ‘Nat’ Coalson, who will be exhibiting his art – brought to life with his Epson 44” printer – at the 5th annual Oxford International Art Fair on 23-25 February 2018.

For Coalson, the difference between the image on screen and in printed form is the difference between fiction and reality: “The high resolution digital photography of today enables incredible creativity and customisation that is meaningful for both the artist and the art buyer; but as long as it is on screen, it’s only bits and pixels. When you print the work onto a physical material, it becomes real because it’s tangible. When you see the human emotional response of someone who experiences your art: that is my truth.”

Coalson has worked professionally in the visual arts since 1987 and has continued to rely on Epson printers to ensure the highest colour fidelity and archival quality of his images since he began taking photographs in the early 1990s. In 2004 he began making fine art prints with his Epson large format printer and is now known for his work in fine art photography and abstract mixed media, with his work being exhibited internationally and held in private and corporate collections worldwide.

Coalson believes in the power of the printed image and, for him, Epson is the brand that embodies this art form. “Epson was the first printing company to demonstrate their commitment to fine art and professional photography by taking inkjet printing to the highest level for this purpose when others focussed on industrial printing instead.”

Epson’s Phil McMullin, sales manager for professional photo printers said: “When the first Epson Stylus Colour printer was released in 1994, demonstrating the company’s dedication to Micro Piezo printing technology, there was incredible excitement from photo enthusiasts – both professional and amateur.  At last, people could rely on unrivalled photo printing technology to give them a digitally produced, gallery-ready print that would last for years, and not months.  Today we are No 1 in the professional photography print market and many photographers rely on our technology to turn their images into prints.”

As part of Epson’s European-wide #ThisIsMyTruth campaign, Epson is shining a light on its professional photographer ambassadors. The campaign is about sharing their stories of how they achieve total control over the integrity of their images – from capture to printed result – to ensure each photo conveys the moment, the story, the subject, the location, and above all the photographer's desire to communicate truth.